Where to celebrate Chinese New Year in London

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17 January 2017 | Location

The Chinese zodiac calendar decrees that 2017 is the Year of the Rooster - and London boasts some of the biggest Chinese New Year celebrations outside of Asia.

So join the festivities on Saturday 28th and Sunday 29th January - Xin Nian Kuai Le (Happy New Year)! 

Chinatown

Lose yourself in the music, flavours and colours of London’s famous Chinatown.

With the Chinese New Year parade set to stream through its vibrant heart on Sunday 29th, there’s even more reason to head down to the West End.

Afterwards, stop to refuel at one of the many pop up food stands and restaurants (though you will likely have to book in advance).  

Tube: Leicester Square

Trafalgar Square

To Round off London’s annual Chinese New Year celebrations on January 29, the capital puts on a colourful parade, complete with Chinese dragons and live performances.

Starting at 10am, the parade sets off from Trafalgar Square and weaves through the centre of Chinatown. From there the parade marches on through the West End before returning to Trafalgar Square for its grand finale.

Throughout the parade, the streets are lined with pop up restaurants, traditional dancers, martial art displays and musical performances.

The parade ends at 6pm with a spectacular firework display over the London skyline.

Tube: Charing Cross

The London Eye

To mark the Year of the Rooster, the iconic London Eye will be lighting up the sky with a spectacular red and gold light show from 4pm on the Friday, Saturday and Sunday (January 27-29).

With a host of activities including guest appearances, dragon dancers and special performances, this promises to be a fantastic way to see in the Chinese New Year.

Tube: Waterloo

The National Maritime Museum

Over the last few years the National Maritime Museum has hosted a series of workshops and family friendly activities to celebrate

And this year proves to be no different. At midday on Saturday 28, visitors can enjoy a live performance exploring the struggles of the tea trade between Britain and China. The following day families can drop in for a traditional storytelling session in the Baltic Glass gallery.

Entry to the National Maritime Museum is free, so you’ll have to beat the crowds to get the best views.

A full list of activities can be viewed here.

Tube: Cutty Sark

Chinese New Year London Eye

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